Writers: How Not to Bomb

How Not to Bomb

How Not to Bomb

When you’re nervous before a reading, open mic or a speaking event you’re that way because you don’t want to bomb. You don’t want to be humiliated and asked never to come back.  You also don’t want to let your audience down. Maybe you’ve had a less-than-ideal speaking experience and you’re afraid lightning will strike twice. I’d like to share a few tips with you on how not to bomb, or at least how to bomb less! Now, let go of your nervousness and give your best performance to the people who have come to see you!

Know Your Audience

If you’re an author giving a reading, know your audience! Are they familiar with your work or are they completely new to it? If they are new to it, warm them up by telling them why they’ll love your work and use humor! If you’re the first speaker, you won’t have a lot of material to riff about except complimentary stuff about the venue, the hosts and the warm crowd, but if you’re performing after an open mic segment or after another speaker, talk up the folks who have  gone before you and give them a little love. Doing so will endear you to your audience.

I had a little issue with a speaking engagement when I realized that my talk was geared towards entrepreneurs and not corporate employees. Oh, boy! I should have asked my speaking coordinator who my audience so I could prepare. But here I was and I spoke to them about how being creative and flexible would make them more effective in their presentations—something from entrepreneur world that they may not deal with on a daily basis.

Collect Stories                    

As you go about your life, collect anecdotes that will resonate with your audience and that will help you break the tension. Just be sure that they’re relevant to you and your reading!

Prepare

Rehearse your talk and material ahead of time—mark your pages if you’re reading from your book so you’re not thumbing randomly! Check to see where you’re stumbling and adjust. Time your talk so you’re going over or under.

Show Up Early

When you show up early rather than on time you give yourself the chance to arrange the room and get a feel for the acoustics. I’ve shown up early at gigs and have rearranged the chairs to go from a classroom to a U-pattern—it’s made all of the difference!

Don’t drink too much

This applies more at a reading or an open mic, but don’t drink even if you think it’ll help you when it’s your turn at the mic. Drink plenty of water and when you’re all through, then have your favorite adult beverage.

Your Turn

OK, so those are my tips on how not to bomb. What have I missed? Please feel free to add a few more suggestions in the comments for us!

Posted in: Workshops, Writing

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2 Comments

  1. Dave Baldwin July 19, 2011

    Don’t drop f-bombs if there are children in the audience!

    reply
    • Alice Osborn July 19, 2011

      Absolutely, Dave! It’s the worst to experience this, especially when it’s your own kids in the room!

      reply

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